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gift tax return

The 2018 Gift Tax Return Deadline is Almost Here

Did you make large gifts to your children, grandchildren or other heirs last year? If so, it’s important to determine whether you’re required to file a 2018 gift tax return — or whether filing one would be beneficial even if it isn’t required. Filing requirements Generally, you must file a gift tax return for 2018…

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interest expense

Matters of Interest: When Are Interest Payments Deductible?

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) has made a significant impact — both directly and indirectly — on the deductibility of interest expense. Here’s a quick review of where things now stand. 5 types of interest Interest expense generally falls within one of five categories: Business interest, Qualified residence interest, Investment interest, Qualified student…

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vehicle-related expenses

Vehicle-Expense Deduction Ins and Outs for Individual Taxpayers

It’s not just businesses that can deduct vehicle-related expenses. Individuals also can deduct them in certain circumstances. Unfortunately, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) might reduce your deduction compared to what you claimed on your 2017 return. For 2017, miles driven for business, moving, medical and charitable purposes were potentially deductible. For 2018 through…

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QOZ

Qualified Opportunity Zones: A Powerful Tax Incentive for Investors

Investors willing to make long-term investments in distressed communities now have a powerful tax incentive for doing so: the Qualified Opportunity Zone (QOZ) program, created by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). The program allows investors who recognize capital gains to reinvest those gains in Qualified Opportunity Funds (QOFs) that, in turn, invest in…

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pass-through entity tax deadline

Beware the Ides of March – If You Own a Pass-Through Entity

Shakespeare’s words don’t apply just to Julius Caesar; they also apply to calendar-year partnerships, S corporations and limited liability companies (LLCs) treated as partnerships or S corporations for tax purposes. Why? The Ides of March, more commonly known as March 15, is the federal income tax filing deadline for these “pass-through” entities. Not-so-ancient history Until…

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nonemployee stock compensation

How to Report Stock Compensation Paid to Nonemployees

The accounting rules for reporting stock compensation have been expanded. They now include share-based payments to nonemployees for providing goods and services, under recent guidance issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). Old rules Under existing U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), the FASB requires businesses that give stock awards to independent contractors or…

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tax deductions

Some of Your Deductions May be Smaller (or Nonexistent) When You File Your 2018 Tax Return

While the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) reduces most income tax rates and expands some tax breaks, it limits or eliminates several itemized deductions that have been valuable to many individual taxpayers. Here are five deductions you may see shrink or disappear when you file your 2018 income tax return: 1. State and local…

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cashless transaction

Auditing Cashless Transactions

Like most businesses, you’ve probably experienced a significant increase in the number of customers who prefer to make cashless payments. And you may be wondering: How does the acceptance of these types of transactions affect the auditing of your financial statements? Cashless transactions require the exchange of digital information to facilitate payments. Instead of focusing…

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three big tax law changes

3 Big TCJA Changes Affecting 2018 Individual Tax Returns and Beyond

When you file your 2018 income tax return, you’ll likely find that some big tax law changes affect you — besides the much-discussed tax rate cuts and reduced itemized deductions. For 2018 through 2025, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) makes significant changes to personal exemptions, standard deductions and the child credit. The degree…

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tax tips

January/February 2019 Tax Tips

Employers can use 401(k) plans to help employees pay student loans In a recent private letter ruling, the IRS approved an employer’s student loan repayment program, under which it made contributions to employees’ 401(k) plan accounts that were contingent on repayments of student loans. Essentially, the employer agreed to make a matching contribution equal to…

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