Accounting & Audit

Going Concern Disclosures Today

With the COVID-19 pandemic well into its second year and the start of planning for the upcoming audit season, you may have questions about how to evaluate your company’s going concern status. While some industries appear to have rebounded from the worst of the economic downturn, others continue to struggle with pandemic-related issues, such as…

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Private companies: Are you on track to meet the 2022 deadline for the updated lease standard?

Updated accounting rules for long-term leases took effect in 2019 for public companies. Now, after several deferrals by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB), private companies and private not-for-profit entities must follow suit, starting in fiscal year 2022. The updated guidance requires these organizations to report — for the first time — the full magnitude…

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CAMs: Thumbs up or thumbs down?

Auditors of public companies started reporting critical audit matters (CAMs) in their audit opinions in 2019. This represents a major change to the pass-fail auditors’ reports that had been in place for decades. Now, accounting rule makers are assessing how this project has fared over the last two years — and whether changes are needed…

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Have you followed up on the management letter from your audit team?

Auditors typically deliver financial statements to calendar-year businesses in the spring. A useful tool that accompanies the annual report is the management letter. It may provide suggestions — based on industry best practices — on how to fortify internal control systems, streamline operations and reduce expenses. Managers generally appreciate the suggestions found in management letters.…

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Internal Control Questionnaires: How to See the Complete Picture

Businesses rely on internal controls to help ensure the accuracy and integrity of their financial statements, as well as prevent fraud, waste and abuse. Given their importance, internal controls are a key area of focus for internal and external auditors. Many auditors use detailed internal control questionnaires to help evaluate the internal control environment —…

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cutoff rules

Follow the Cutoff Rules for Revenue and Expenses

Timing counts in financial reporting. Under the accrual method of accounting, the end of the accounting period serves as a strict “cutoff” for recognizing revenue and expenses. However, during the COVID-19 pandemic, managers may be tempted to show earnings or reduce losses. As a result, they may extend revenue cutoffs beyond the end of the…

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accounting estimates

Accounting Estimates Present Challenges in Times of Uncertainty

In today’s unprecedented market conditions, it can be challenging to predict metrics that underlie your company’s accounting estimates. Examples of key “unknowns” include how much longer certain pandemic issues will continue, how federal stimulus spending will affect the economy over the long run, and the extent to which tax laws and environment regulations may change…

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working capital

Hit or Miss: Is Your Working Capital On-Target?

Working capital equals the difference between current assets and current liabilities. Organizations need a certain amount of working capital to run their operations smoothly. The optimal (or “target”) amount of working capital depends on the nature of operations and the industry. Inefficient working capital management can hinder growth and performance. Benchmarks The term “liquidity” refers…

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capital

Using Your Financial Statements to Evaluate Capital Budgeting Decisions

Strategic investments — such as expanding a plant, purchasing a major piece of equipment or introducing a new product line — can add long-term value. But management shouldn’t base these decisions on gut instinct. A comprehensive, formal analysis can help minimize the guesswork and maximize your return on capital investment. Forecasting cash flows  Financial forecasts…

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fair value accounting

What’s “Fair Value” in an Accounting Context?

In recent years, the accounting rules for certain balance sheet items have transitioned from historical cost to “fair value.” Examples of assets that may currently be reported at fair value are asset retirement obligations, derivatives and intangible assets acquired in a business combination. Though fair value may better align your company’s financial statements with today’s…

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